The DeLorean DMC-12 Socks ūüĒ•

The DeLorean DMC-12 Socks ūüĒ•

In the realm of iconic automobiles, there's one that stands out as a symbol of both innovation and intrigue. Let us take you back to the future, with the one and only DeLorean DMC-12.

¬†You can‚Äôt claim to have had a childhood if you didn‚Äôt see ‚ÄúBack To The Future‚ÄĚ at least a dozen times. Right up there with 80‚Äôs classics such as ‚ÄúGoonies‚ÄĚ,¬†‚ÄúE.T.‚Ä̬†or
‚ÄúIndiana Jones‚ÄĚ, the Michael J. Fox starred, and Robert Zemeckis directed trilogy left all of us dreaming of a future¬†where hoverboards and self-tying
sneakers would be a reality. 

But no novelty or movie star on ‚ÄúBack To The¬†Future‚ÄĚ made quite as much of an¬†impression as the¬†time-machine¬†itself ‚Äď the futuristic, eye-catching, drop dead¬†gorgeous DeLorean DMC-12. The DMC-12 was the brainchild¬†of¬†John¬†DeLorean,¬†an American automotive executive who¬†founded the¬†DeLorean¬†Motor Company in 1975,¬†with the¬†goal of¬†producing a¬†distinctive and¬†innovative sports car.
 
The DMC-12, the only model ever produced by the company, featured a stainless steel body and distinctive gull-wing doors. The car's design was, we can all agree, stunning, drawing attention for its unique appearance ‚Äď after all,¬†Zemeckis chose it for a reason.

However, the DeLorean Motor Company faced various challenges, including financial¬†difficulties and issues with the car's performance. In 1981, the production of the DMC-12 came to an end, leaving the DMC filing for bankruptcy. Despite its short-lived production run,¬†the¬†DMC-12 gained a second life as the¬†‚ÄúBack¬†To¬†The Future¬†‚ÄĚ time machine,¬† created by Dr. Emmett ‚ÄúDoc‚ÄĚ Brown.

The film was a box office hit, turning the DMC-12 into an overnight sensation.

The increase in demand led to a rush in production, resulting in a lot of quality control issues. The stainless steel body, while visually striking, proved challenging to manufacture consistently and the Gull-wing doors, a design highlight, often experienced malfunctions, leaving owners grappling with maintenance headaches.
 
To make matters worse, and despite its futuristic appearance, the DeLorean's performance didn't match its aesthetic promise. The 130-horsepower engine struggled to deliver the speed and power expected from a sports car - this disparity between looks and performance left enthusiasts yearning for more under the hood.
 
When it didn’t seem possible, the plot thickened: in 1982, John DeLorean was arrested on drug trafficking charges related to a cocaine sting operation. Although he was acquitted, with his defence claiming entrapment,the legal battle had lasting repercussions on his career and personal life.

As for the DeLorean, and not surprisingly, the 2nd batch of its production run was short-lived. With financial constraints and the company's bankruptcy, only about 9,000 cars were made. The limited availability has since contributed to the mystique surrounding the DeLorean, making it a rare find between collectors and enthusiasts.

WITH ROUGHLY 500 DMC-12¬īS LEFT,
IT¬īS¬†NOT EVERY DAY YOU GET TO SEE ONE ON THE
OPEN ROAD. BUT AS DOC BROWN ONCE PUT IN,
"ROADS? WE¬īRE GOING, WE DON¬īT NEED ROADS".